Splenic hematoma and pelvic bladder in a spayed German shepherd mongrel bitch (Canis lupus familiaris). A case report.

Authors

  • Iosif Vasiu Universitar of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj -Napoca https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6788-411X
  • Oros Valentin Nicuşor Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Mănăştur Street, Cluj-Napoca, 400372, Romania
  • Aştilean Andreea Niculina Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Mănăştur Street, Cluj-Napoca, 400372, Romania
  • Melega Iulia Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Mănăştur Street, Cluj-Napoca, 400372, Romania
  • Rusu Andreea Small Animals Emergency Hospital, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Mănăştur Street, Cluj-Napoca, 400372
  • Purdoiu Robert Department of Imagistics and Internal Diseases, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Vet-erinary Medicine, 3-5 Mănăştur Street, Cluj-Napoca, 400372
  • Tăbăran Flaviu Department of Pathology, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Mănăştur Street, Cluj-Napoca, 400372
  • Vasiu Mariana Bioclinica, 10 Ştrandului Street, Sibiu, 550068, Romania
  • Mocanu Emanuel Mihai Fia Vet, 1 Fragilor Street Sibiu, 550246, Romania
  • Ober Ciprian Andrei Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery, University of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine Cluj-Napoca, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, 3-5 Mănăştur Street, Cluj-Napoca, 400372, Romania

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.52331/cvj.v27i1.36

Keywords:

Canis lupus familiaris, Splenic hematoma, Pelvic bladder, OHE, UI, USMI

Abstract

: Splenic hematomas represent the most encountered splenic benign masses in dogs (Canis lupus familiaris), and they are usually secondary to splenic nodular hyperplasia. In most spayed bitches with urinary incontinence (UI), pelvic bladders are a common finding. In addition, ovariohysterectomy (OHE), hormonal imbalances, and various anatomical anomalies are responsible for the onset of urethral sphincter mechanism incompetence (USMI). This case report highlights the aggravating aspect caused by a splenic hematoma to develop a pelvic bladder in a mongrel bitch, that was sterilized seven years ago. A 14-years-old spayed German shepherd was presented to the Emergency Veterinary Hospital in Cluj-Napoca, with a history of apathy, incontinence, and foul kennel smell, for several months. The diagnostic was based on anamnesis, medical history, imagistic, and routine laboratory assays. The main findings were the presence of a pelvic bladder, splenic hematoma, and chronic cholecystitis. The bitch was admitted for 14 days. Surgical intervention was required, so a splenectomy was performed. Besides the surgical management and the supportive care, the bitch also received treatment for UI with phenylpropanolamine (PPA; Propalin 5%; 1.2 mg/kg 12h PO prn). Three days after surgery and treatment, the bitch recovered the urinary tonus, and UI was absent. The bitch was discharged two weeks after the surgical intervention. The presence of splenic hematomas can precipitate the development of UI by partially translocating the urinary bladder into the pelvic cavity (i.e., pelvic bladder), especially in old spayed bitches.

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Published

2022-06-28

How to Cite

Vasiu, I., Valentin Nicuşor , O., Andreea Niculina, A., Iulia , M., Andreea , R., Robert, P., Flaviu, T., Mariana , V., Emanuel Mihai , M. and Ciprian Andrei , O. (2022) “ A case report”., Cluj Veterinary Journal, 27(1), pp. 10–20. doi: 10.52331/cvj.v27i1.36.